Atmosphere

By the worktables in the art room at my school is a window, and above that window is a message from the art teacher to her students:

You are my why!

The words draw your eyes as soon as you walk into the room. They convey more than a greeting; they impart a sense of importance, of being wanted, of being cared about. They are a word-hug of welcome, of belonging, of mattering.

I think about how little is in teachers’ control these days, how the art of teaching is increasingly straightjacketed, hijacked. Expectations on top of expectations, a precariously unwieldy, wobbling mountain, stones heaped one by one, Greek thlipsis until a person’s spirit is crushed rather than one’s actual body. I see, hear, and feel this incremental adding of weight in every day interactions with colleagues. Opening lines from the old Christmas movie It’s a Wonderful Life come to mind, when the angels, appearing as stars in the cosmos, are talking:

FRANKLIN: A man down on Earth needs our help.

CLARENCE: Splendid! Is he sick?

FRANKLIN: No, worse. He’s discouraged.

—Truth.

A gallery of teacher faces appears in my mind.

Then I see these words on the wall and I think, that’s the breathing room. 

The beginning of atmosphere.

Before learning, before discovering, before creating, before engagement, empowerment, objectives or standards, before all the materials and tools are ever distributed, there’s atmosphere. 

It’s both bigger and smaller than the what of climate and the how of culture. Atmosphere in a classroom still lies wholly within the power of the teacher. It starts as small as the heartbeat of the teacher that keeps showing up to say You are my why.

The heartbeat, the breath, that keeps the entire organism alive.

5 thoughts on “Atmosphere

  1. It wasn’t until I interviewed to be a librarian that I remember saying aloud “I want students to feel welcome in our space together,” but thinking back to my previous classrooms, it was always the sense of community that pulled us (me!) through the rough patches of teaching. Thanks for reinforcing this with your post today!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. The sign is beautiful and a testimony to the teacher’s desire to create a sense of student community. Even more important, your word choice in this post adds to the feeling of calm and peacefully. You have inspired me this morning to be better at descriptive word choice. Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Beautifully written! “You are my why” – I do believe I may need to hang that in my room, or near the door entering my room. As you so eloquently pointed out, the atmosphere that each teacher creates in his her room, contributes to the growth and comfort of each child in not only the classroom but that atmosphere also contributes to the overall atmosphere of the school! This is my favorite line “Atmosphere in a classroom still lies wholly within the power of the teacher. It starts as small as the heartbeat of the teacher that keeps showing up to say You are my why.” Thanks for sharing, Fran!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Ooh, wow. What a powerful statement! I love how you linked it to the line about being discouraged, because we have all been there, and it’s so essential to remember our “why”s. And so extra important to make sure students know we are there for them!

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s