Burrows and seeds poetry

On Day 4 of National Poetry Month, Jennifer Guyor Jowett, inspired by poet Irene Latham, offers this invitation for VerseLove at Ethical ELA: “Create your own burrow. Find a seed at the end of the piece, something to begin your own writing today. Let it serve as a title or beginning line.”

I borrowed some of these beautiful ending lines from fellow VerseLove poet, Kevin Hodgson:

We poets keep watching
for dust, falling,
in flight.

Ars Poetica: Dustcatching

We poets keep watching for dust, falling
we would capture it with our hands
feel it on our tongues as it lands
genesis of words breathing life
dust to dust, falling 
from the stars

from the stars
dust to dust, falling
genesis of words breathing life
feel it on our tongues as it lands 
we would capture it with our hands
we poets keep watching for dust, falling

Stardust. Send me adrift. CC BY-NC-ND 2.0


2 thoughts on “Burrows and seeds poetry

  1. This form and your central symbol (dust) enable you to illustrate brilliantly the poet’s ability to make the temporal and incidental become immortal through the sacred cycle of life. Material forms are impermanent (dust to dust), but you as a poet taste and capture them–and breathe the life of revelation into them.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you for this stunningly beautiful response, Paul. And for catching that significance of dust to dust. The obvious “ashes to ashes, dust to dust” came to mind as I wrote but also the idea that, scientifically, we are made of the same stuff as the stars – stardust.

      Liked by 1 person

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